Python and Raspberry Pi talk at FOSDEM

Earlier this month, I spoke on the Python track at FOSDEM 2017. My talk introduced the Raspberry Pi as a tool for physical computing and IoT to Python programmers in the free & open-source software community.

I talked about the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s mission, our education programmes, introduced the GPIO pinout, HATs, GPIO Zero, Remote GPIO, Picamera, Energenie, Sense HAT, Astro Pi and more. You can view the slides, and watch the video here:

All Things Open 2016 – Raspberry Pi for everyone!

I recently attended All Things Open, an open-source conference in Raleigh, North Carolina, run by Red Hat. I was invited by my friends at opensource.com – and it was a great opportunity to meet the team and some of the moderators, columnists and contributors.

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

ATO2016

I was asked to give a lightning talk, and I decided to speak about the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s mission: what we do, how we do it, and where we’re at now! Here’s the video of the talk (3m20s):

What is the Raspberry Pi Foundation? 10 million computers sold

The Raspberry Pi Foundation began with the purpose to find a way to get more students at Cambridge University to study Computer Science. A small, cheap Linux computer called the Raspberry Pi was created as the solution, and since the first product in 2012, educators, hobbyists, and industrial users have been creating amazing projects with it.

My slides are published on speakerdeck. I also wrote an article on the same subject for my column that month: Raspberry Pi continues to blaze new trails.

I also got the opportunity to visit Red Hat Towers, and meet their CEO Jim Whitehurst to talk about why I contribute to opensource.com. And for the conference social afterparty, they’d booked nerdcore artist MC Frontalot!

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

You have more stickers on your laptop than I’ve ever seen. Would you like a Vim mug?” #ATO2016

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

There’s no money in open-source

Thanks to the All Things Open and opensource.com teams, to Red Hat, to Jim Whitehurst, and to all the speakers at ATO!

PyCon Russia keynote – Physical computing with Python and Raspberry Pi

I was invited to give the closing keynote at PyCon Russia, which took place in Moscow in July. It was my first visit to Russia – and I had a great trip.

Ben Nuttall on Twitter

Today I am mostly being the Raspberry Pi Community at @PyConRu

I travelled with David McIver, the author of property-based testing framework, hypothesis. I also got to spend some time with other international speakers including Jackie Kazil (whom I met on my 2014 US Tour), Python core developer Raymond Hettinger, Google developer Nathaniel Manista, and (local) Armin Ronacher, the creator of the Flask web framework.

 

Here’s the video of my talk on Physical computing with Python and Raspberry Pi. I spoke about the Raspberry Pi, the Foundation and its mission, and lots of technical detail about the GPIO Zero library:

Physical computing with Python and Raspberry Pi, Ben Nuttall, Raspberry Pi

Uploaded by ??????? ?????????? on 2016-07-13.

You’ll find my slides on speakerdeck.

Simple Electronics with GPIO Zero book

Today the MagPi team released a new publication: Simple Electronics with GPIO Zero.

Essentials-07-GPIO-ZERO_Flat_Cover

This 100-page book takes you from the basics, like lighting an LED, all the way to building projects like an Internet radio using the GPIO Zero Python library.

This book is available as a free PDF, but you can also pay to get it for your iPad or Android device with the MagPi app. Soon it will also be released in print. It’s now available in print. All proceeds go towards the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s education programmes.

GPIOZeroSpread

I’ve been amazed with how the GPIO Zero project has grown. There have been three major releases (a fourth due later this year), and it has been featured in The MagPi many times, and in three Kickstarter projects: the RasPiO Pro HAT; Analog Zero; and GPIO Zero Ruler.

Also check out the GPIO Zero documentation, the Physical Computing with Python resource, and GPIO Zero on GitHub.

Raspberry Pi Weekly

Back in 2013, inspired by PyCoders Weekly, a great Python email newsletter, I created Pi Weekly, the same sort of thing for Raspberry Pi. Each week I curated a collection of links to news, projects and articles from the Raspberry Pi community. Its subscriber base grew steadily and within a few weeks it was featured on the Raspberry Pi blog. Towards the end of that year I was given the opportunity to go and work for the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and I continued to run the newsletter in the same format.

140 weeks into the project, having not missed a single week, it was relaunched with a new look and moved into the Raspberry Pi website as the Foundation’s official newsletter.

raspberry-pi-weekly-archive
All past issues are available to browse on the website

I created a simple system for the newsletter generation. The whole thing is based within in a WordPress site, and issues are just posts with a set of custom fields, a repeater for the links, and a post template to show the issue as a web page. Then a plugin I wrote generates a full document of the same content in email-friendly HTML. For Pi Weekly, this was just a bog standard Mailchimp email template with my content in it, but for the official Raspberry Pi Weekly, I created a custom template made by our designer Sam Alder. The code for Pi Weekly is available on GitHub, it just requires the ACF plugin and the appropriate custom fields created. It would be fairly easy to create such a system in another CMS or web framework.

I wrote more about how Pi Weekly started and how it played a part in getting me hired at the Foundation in Pi Weekly – MVP, Evolution and My Dream Job and you can see how I announced it in Announcing Pi Weekly.

raspberry-pi-weekly
Be sure to check out the new Raspberry Pi Weekly